Monday, August 24, 2009

TRYING SOME NEW TEA


When I last placed an order from Special Teas for some Ceylon, my package included a ½ ounce sample of a delicious black tea called East Frisian Broken Blend. This is a wonderful strong robust black tea and one that would be delicious with savories served at afternoon tea. It is a mixture of Assam, Sumatra, and Java teas. This blend was also a winner in the 2008 World Tea Championship...One sip of this concoction, with milk and sugar, and you’ll instantly know why.

East Frisia, a part of the German Federal State of Lower Saxony on the North Sea, is second only to Ireland when it comes to tea consumption. According to Wikipedia, “East Frisian Tea is sweetened with kluntjes, a rock candy sugar that melts slowly, allowing multiple cups to be sweetened. Heavy cream is also used to flavor the tea. The tea is generally served in traditional small cups, with little cookies during the week and cake during special occasions or on weekends as a special treat. Brown rum, mixed with kluntjes and left for several months, is also added to black tea in the winter. The tea is alleged to cure headaches, stomach problems, and stress, among many other ailments”.

For a sample of this wonderful aromatic blend, visit Special Teas, and while you’re at it, you might want to try the Single Estate Ceylon. I’m partial to the Kenilworth Orange Pekoe (No317) which has a lovely hypnotic rose aroma.

11 comments:

Betsy said...

This sounds delish! I'm stuck on Darjeeling at the moment! :)

Marie Antionette said...

Hello my Dear,
First I want to comment on the post below.I'm so sorry to hear about your loss.Lizzie sounds like she was a wonderful part of your family.I know you will miss her.We had to put our beloved Scotty to rest.He had cancer.He too was a wonderful family.My heart goes out to you. Maybe Lizzie and Scotty are playing together in heaven.
I usually don't drink much tea,but lately I have been.This black tea certainly sounds interesting.I love to have some of that sugar that slowly melts.And I also love heavy creams.You always have lovely posts.You take care. XXOO Marie Antionette

Rebecca said...

Marie A,

Thank you so much for the kind words...I have no doubt they are playing blissfully together....

As for the tea, it really is a wonderful blend. Though I don't have the Kluntjes typically used to sweeten it, I just add sugar cubes...It's wonderful that way, too...

Rebecca said...

Betsy,

Darjeeling is such a great tea. I keep some handy as it pairs well with so many different foods and is also great to just enjoy on it's own.

Lady Katherine said...

Sounds wonderful! My tea cabinet is full! I just love my Vanilla Cream Tea!

Charm and Grace said...

Your recommendations sound just wonderful, especially the East Frisian Broken Blend. At some point I hope to try some of these. We have a "special tea" maker here in our area, Miss Rosemarie's Special Teas." She also runs a tearoom where ladies (and gentlemen, if so inclined) can come for lunch and/or tea. Though the tearoom is in a shopping center, once you enter the tearoom you'd never know it. Fine china, silver, antiques, beautifully decorated tables, fresh flowers and more await you... along with the wonderful tea and accoutrements. It is a bit pricey, but such a treat when I am able to go. She sells delicious homemade special teas... also a bit pricey but worth it for the taste.

Blessings,
Christi

ChaChaneen said...

Black teas are my favorite because I am a milk and sugar kind of gal! This sounds like a keeper. I love it when we have little surprises that are tucked into orders, my tea cabinet has grown because I probably wouldn't have known about some of the gems without the samples.

ChaChaneen said...

By the way I lurve your new banner, it is from your display in the shop?

suz said...

Ilove your blog and am so glad you're back. About the kluntjes. These can be made by filling a jar with concentrated simple syrup, i.e. 1/2 c. water and about 1 1/2 c. sugar or as much as you can get without it thickening. Tie a piece of fairly heavy string (heavier than kite string) onto a bamboo skewer and place the string into the sugar mixture and let it dangle from the top of the jar as the skewer is placed across the opening. Leave this in a cool dry place and check it every few days. It depends upon your climate as to how long the sugar becomes a solid, lovely chunk. When the water has evaporated, remove the sugar from the jar and let it cure in a dry place for a few days covered with cheesecloth, or tie it from something and let it dangle in a clean dry environment. Then place it in the bottom of your tea pot after your tea has been brewed leaving the string hanging over the side to lift it out with. I think this should work. You can remove the sugar according to your taste. It's been a long time since I've made these.

Rebecca said...

Thanks, Janeen! Yes, those are my teacups.

Rebecca said...

Suz,

Thanks for stopping by and thanks a bunch for this recipe. I'm going to try to make this:-) Yum!