Wednesday, January 20, 2010

THEME THURSDAY: BREAD

Homage to the Scone






We eat more than our fair share of bread at our Tea Society events, and being a “southern girl” I’ve certainly grown up eating lots of my Grandmother’s mouthwatering buttermilk biscuits and my Mother’s delectable cornbread. Yet, when I think of bread, my first thought is of the Scone...

Ah, that trademark sidekick to the ultimate cuppa. I’ve made them so often for tea events that I think I could make them in my sleep and I can’t really imagine a tea event without them. Being the history buff that I am, of course I had to delve into the origin of this wonderful tea accompaniment.

When I think of scones, I tend to associate their appearance at the "Tea Table" with refinement and a traditional English Afternoon Tea. However, the origin of this bread is believed to have been in Scotland. In its earliest form, it was a simple quick bread made with oats and barley flour. It was often shaped into a round mound and scored or cut into wedges. The dough was then baked on a Scottish griddle or “girdle” over an open fire.

Where did the name come from? It is believed that this popular Tea bread took its name from the Pictish Kingdom of Scone (Scotland). The exact origin of the name is possibly Dutch, German, or Gaelic. The pronunciation is also intriguing and debatable. Throughout Great Britain one may hear “skaun” or “skoane”. Either is considered acceptable. I have to admit, being born and raised south of the Mason Dixon line, I tend to favor the latter, “skoane”, drawing out the “oa”, of course…

Ah...care to join me for some cream cheese and pecan scones with strawberry jam and clotted cream- all with bottomless pots of Barry’s Irish Breakfast?

27 comments:

Mmm said...

YUM!! where do I sing up? but can you really provide the thick Devonshire clotted cream as show here too?

My mother adn aunt tend to pronounce it as "skon" whereas I say scoan liek most here. I like that long "o" too.

Funny you chose to focus on wsomethig scottish. So did I 1 I knew, in fact this origin of scones. Intersting, no? Now, to get a thick tartan and to buryoneself down with a hot cuppa (As you well note) adn a scone--well, that's jsut the bsicuit, isn't it?

:)

BTW, did you know that Scotland was once called Pictland--the land of the Picts, as the original 'natives' as it were, painted themselves blue and such? Pictish became Scottish and so on. Fascinating stuff, all this type of thing. We;. somethings have changed, but I'm just quite glad some remained--scones, porridge, and so on! :)

Protege said...

Oh my goodness, did you take these pictures? They are *delicious*! My mouth is literally watering, yum! And I know how difficult taking pictures of food can be.
Thank you so much for the facts and the origins and history of tea bread and scones.;)
xo
Zuzana

Brian Miller said...

me too. me too. love a good skon. neat history as well. happy tt!

Queenmothermamaw said...

I'll be up right away, just let me get my clothes on. Oh no It is raining cats and dogs, guess I will stay here and have virtual tea and scones, long o, with you.
QMM

Rebecca said...

MMM,

No need to sign up..Mr. Toast, you're always welcome for Tea and scones ... I can actually get my hands on some jarred clotted cream but I usually make a mock version of it for Tea events. Not quite the same but still good.

And, yes, I had read that about Scotland ...Hum...now, where have I seen the blue paint? Ah, yes, Braveheart wasn't it? :D

Rebecca said...

Zuzana, I wish...Nope, they are compliments of Google images...I had some pictures of mine on my old computer but haven't retrieved my files yet.

Brian, come on over, the kettle's on as I'm typing this:)

QMM, Come on over! We really do need to meet. I want any excuse to go back to Whistle Stop in Glendale...so just whistle..tee..hee... I'll also bet you make a mean scone. Being a "Southern Lady", I just know you could make some mouthwatering biscuits and gravy, too..Oh, I am so hungry!

willow said...

My mouth is watering over here!

Betsy said...

Mmmm...I'll take one please and a cuppa! You know, I've never had clotted cream! What does it compare to..sour cream? or is it sweet?

JeffScape said...

I remember not wanting to try a scone because I didn't like the name of it.

Funny how that works.

Jill said...

Rebecca! I am lodging a complaint against you with THEME THURSDAY for having THE MOST scrumptious photographs!!! I can almost taste that scone but am SO disappointed I cannot! PERFECT photo!

I believe I should have some lunch before going on with reading TT!

Tom said...

i love tea, so i guess a scone is the next logical step...

ah, i'm going to minimize you so i can keep listening to the soothing music.

Wings said...

If you can please serve a pot of coffee, I will be there. My mouth is watering already!

C.M. Jackson said...

just when I thought --ok enough bread---I find your lovely post on scones---what a delight!strawberries and clotted cream? Ok, maybe just one bite;-) great post-c

Dreamhaven said...

This weeks theme is deadly for my waistline,lol

Mmm said...

Thanks for the b'day song, btw.

LadyCat said...

The pecan scone with cream cheese sounds good to me...

Kris said...

I will admit that I am a savoury scone man myself...

ChaChaneen said...

Hi Girlfriend!
I can see I am behind in my blog reading here! ha ha That scone looks delicious!

Just wanted to let you know I updated my post on the bible study and have included links so you can watch a free sample video of what the DVD's look like and other information. Would lurve to see you plugged into something like this with me or right in your own church community.

Blessings!
Janeen

Our Porch in Hillsborough said...

Wow - that scone makes my mouth water. I think I will have to make some over the weekend. I love your history of scones and the pronunciation comments as well. And, being from NC, I use the long 'o'!
Cheers,
Leah

ChaChaneen said...

Hi again, came back to see if you had posted yet about your Artist Reception! It is tonight right? I'm hoping you will have a wonderful turnout for your show and can't wait to hear all the details!

La Petite Gallery said...

I have only had a few scones that were light and fluffy. The ones
for sale here are like hocky pucks.
Night and Day... Those scones are
the one.

yvonne

Megan said...

Oh my that looks wonderful. I need to learn how to make these. The store-bought stuff here is just not the same.

Blog Princess G said...

What a gorgeous post, and stunning pics! My mouth is watering. The happy coincidence is that I'm making scones (skons) for tea today. Yum yum.

Charm and Grace said...

Oh my goodness, I do love scones. But seriously, cream chees and pecan, strawberry jam and clotted cream... you might as well just send me off to heaven. I'll have Twinning's English Breakfast with mine, please.

:) Christi

jeannette stgermain said...

I LOVE to eat the American scones. The way I said that is because I once ate scones at my friend's house and she's married to a Brit. her scones looked mare like flat hard cookies (not bready).
I wonder where you got the info. that the scone may also originate from the Dutch -I doubt it, because I am Dutch, and we do not have anything in pastries right now that reminds me of a scone (I am Dutch).
Lovely blog!

Rebecca said...

Hello Jeanette..No,not the bread itself originating with the Dutch, but possibly the etymology. I've read this in a number of cookbooks. Sorry if that was confusing.

Websters Dictionary actually states that they originated in the Pictish Kingdom( Scotland), as I noted, in the 1500's, though the name "Scone" dates back earlier.

anthonynorth said...

That made me feel so very hungry. Lovely.